dragonfly

TruLife 4K. Reality inside

4K is only truly 4K if your video-processing pipeline can handle the job end to end, start to finish at 1.2 Gigapixels per second. Boxer’s knock out blow has to be the ability to upgrade it’s standard TruLife 60Hz configuration to a staggering 120Hz. Only TruLife 4K can do this because it’s the only 4K DLP image processing that runs at 120Hz.

It’s taken the latest field-programmable, gate array, integrated circuits and a proprietary floating point architecture to achieve – and it’s taken all the image interpolation and upsampling out of 4K – so you get every pixel doing it’s job.­­ With Boxer it’s simple, what you put in, you get out.

TruLife lite is also available for HD and 2K, including Boxer 20/25/30.

competition

We’re fighting for True 4K

Rivals upscale content by copying pixels and adding them vertically and horizontally. Their processors can increase fps too – by adding additional frames so 60 fps footage becomes 240 fps. It’s a process known as ‘smoothing’.

Up-scaling techniques may have come a long way – but with Boxer we believe that there’s a time and place for ‘wobulation’ and ‘quadsampling’ –they only delay the truth that native 4K workflow is the future.

fall

2K – 4K Performance upgrade path

We understand your customers’ requirements today will not be the same tomorrow. The Christie Boxer Series offers an upgrade path – giving you options that meet your changing budget, brightness and resolution needs. With configuration choices of 2K or 4K resolution, brightness ranging from 20,000 – 30,000 lumens and refresh rates of 60Hz or 120Hz, you only pay for what you need today.

stairs

Experience Christie TruLife at 120Hz

Ars Electronic Deep Space exhibit. Linz, Austria.

learn more >

Deeper colour, superior brightness

The Boxer’s colour space exceeds Rec. 709. We could tell you that this is because we’ve used mercury lamps, 4K resolution and 120Hz frame rates to make our colours deeper, our brightness higher, and your image quality better than any other projector in its class. But why complicate matters, when it only takes one look?

deeper

< Back to features